ǽfen-steorra
Morphological Analysis
Wordclass: Noun
Gender: Masculine
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
ǽfen-steorra
an; m. The evening star; Hesperus; the Grk. ἕσπερος [Lat. vesper], the evening star, is called by Hesiod a son of and Eos, and was regarded by the ancients the same as the morning star, whence both Homer and Hesiod call him the bringer of light, ἑωσ-φόροας, Il. xxii. 318: xxiii. 226. The Romans designated him by the names Lucifer and Hesperus, to characterise him as the morning or evening star Se steorra ðe we hátaþ ǽfensteorra, ðonne he biþ west gesewen, ðonne tácnnaþ he ǽfen. Fǽrþ he ðonne æfter ðære sunnan on ðære eorþan sceade, óþ he ofirnþ ða sunnan hindan, and cymþ wið fóran ða sunnan up, ðonne háten we hine morgensteorra (q. v.) forðam he cymþ eástan up, bodaþ ðære sunnan cyme the star which we call the evening star, when it is seen westwardly, then it betokens the evening. It then goes after the sun into the earth's shade, till it runs off behind the sun, and comes up before the sun, then we call it the morning star, because it comes up in the east, and announces the sun's approach, Bt. 39, 13; Fox 232, 34. Se móna, mid his blácan leóhte, dunniaþ ðone beorhtan steorran, ðe we hátaþ morgensteorra: ðone ilcan we hátaþ óðre naman, ǽfensteorra the moon, with his pale light, obscures the bright star, which we call the morning star: the same we call by another name, the evening star, 4; Fox 8, 3.
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