C
Gender: Indeterminate
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
C
In Gothic and Icelandic C is entirely wanting, being always represented by k. It is remarkable that the Anglo-Saxons have seldom made use of k; but, following the Latin, have preferred the use of c. 1. the letter c is found as an initial, medial, and final. — As an initial letter it corresponds to the Gothic amd Icelandic k; as, — A. Sax. corn corn, Goth. karn, Icel. korn; A; Sax. ceósan to choose, Goth. kiusan, Icel. kjósa. As a medial and final letter c corresponds to the Gothic and Icelandic k, — thus A. Sax. æcer a field, Goth. akrs, Icel. akr; A. Sax. eác also, Goth. auk, Icel. ok [og]. 2. c and cc are often changed into h or hh before s or þ, and especially before t; as, strehton they stretched, for strecton from streccan. Ahsian for acsian or axian to ask; séhþ for sécþ seeks, from sécan to seek. In words immediately derived from Anglo-Saxon, k is frequently substituted for the Anglo-Saxon c ; as, cyning a king; cyn kin or kindred. Sometimes q or ch; as, cwén queen; cild a child; cin a chin. 3. the Runic letter RUNE not only stands for the letter c, but also for the name of the letter in Anglo-Saxon cén a torch, v. cén and RÚN.
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