E
Gender: Indeterminate
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
E
Anglo-Saxon words, containing the short or unaccented vowel e, are often represented by modern English words of the same meaning, having the sound of e in net, met, ; as, Nett, bedd, weddian, hell, well, denn, fenn, webb, ende. 2. the short e in Anglo-Saxon generally comes 1. before a double consonant; as, Nebb, weccan, tellan, weddian: 2. before any two consonants; as, Twentig, sendan, bernan: 3. before one or two consonants, when followed by a long or by a final vowel; as, Sele, henne. 3. e is often contracted from ea; as, Ceaster and cester a burgh, fortified town; eahta and ehta eight.
B. Words containing the long or accented Anglo-Saxon é are very frequently represented by English terms of the same signification, with the sound of e in heel; as, Réc, méd, hél, cwén, gés, fét, téþ, hédan, fédan, métan to meet. Some remarks on the accented é in Grimm's Deutsche Grammatik, 2nd Edit. Göttingen, small 8vo. 1822, vol. i. pp. 229, 230: 3rd Edit. small 8vo. 1840, vol. i. pp. 361, 362, may be found useful, and are especially recommended to the student of Anglo-Saxon.
2. it is, however, difficult to say when the e is long in Anglo-Saxon, but it may be useful to remember, the e is often long before the single consonants l, m, n, r, c, d, f, g, s, t, and þ; as, in hél a heel, félan to feel, déman to deem, think, fénix a phænix, hér here, gés geese, fét feet, fédan to feed, téþ teeth, béc books, blégen a Wain, dréfan to trouble.
C. The Runic RUNE not only stands for the vowel e, but also for the name of the letter in Anglo-Saxon, eh a war-horse, v. eh a war-horse, and RÚN.
This is a supplementary entry with editorial changes to an entry in the main volume of the dictionary. Look under the 'Possibly connected entries' below, or for the same headword in the list to the left.

A Combined List of Abbreviations.

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A Combined List of Abbreviations.