G
Gender: Indeterminate
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
G
WHEN g is the last radical letter of an Anglo-Saxon word, and follows a long vowel or an r, it is often changed into h, but then the g is resumed when followed by a vowel; as, - Beáh a ring; gen. es; m. beáges of a ring; pl. beágas rings; burh a town; gen. e; f. burge of a town; beorh a hill; gen. es; m. beorges of a hill; pl. beorgas hills. The same change takes place after a short vowel in wah a wall; gen. wages. In the conjugation of verbs, in some cases; h is found taking the place of g; thus from belgan to be angry, bilhst, bilhþ; from ágan to own, áhte. 2. g is generally inserted between the vowels -ie, making -ige, -igende, etc. the first sing. pres. and part of verbs in -ian. Thus, from lufian to love, bletsian to bless, etc. are formed ic lufige I love, ic bletsige I bless, lufigende loving, bletsigende blessing. 3. In later English the place of the earlier g is often taken by y, sometimes by w; as, - Geár a year, dæg a day, dagas days. etc; morg(en) morrow, sorg = sorrow, etc. 4. The Anglo-Saxon Rune RUNE not only stands for the letter g, but for gifu a gift, because gifu is the Anglo-Saxon name of this Rune, v. gifu II. and RÚN.
This is a supplementary entry with editorial changes to an entry in the main volume of the dictionary. Look under the 'Possibly connected entries' below, or for the same headword in the list to the left.

A Combined List of Abbreviations.

Abbreviation not recognized. See:

A Combined List of Abbreviations.