Bosworth Toller's

Anglo-Saxon

Dictionary online

CNIHT

  • noun [ masculine ]
Dictionary links
Grammar
CNIHT, cneoht, cnyht, es; m.
Wright's OE grammar
§5; §49; §86; §157; §169; §182; §326; §335;
A boy, youth, attendant, servant, KNIGHT: hence the modern knights of a shire are so called because theyserve the shire; puer, juvenis, adolescens, servus
Show examples
  • Sum lytel sweltende cniht

    a little dying boy,

      Bd. 4, 8; S. 575, 23: Ors. 3, 7; Bos. 58, 43.
  • Tyn wintra cniht

    a boy of ten years,

      L. In. 7; Th. i. 106, 18: Lk. Bos. 7, 7: Bd. 5, 19; S. 637, 4: Byrht. Th. 136, 18; By. 153.
  • Fram ðínum cnihte

    a puero tuo.

      Ps. Th. 68, 17.
  • Heó cwæþ to ðam cnihte

    ait ad puerum,

      Gen. 24, 65.
  • Cwicne abregd cniht of áde

    take the boy alive from the pile,

      Cd. 141; Th. 176, 20; Gen. 2914: 162; Th. 203, 20; Exod. 406.
  • Ðú ðone cnyht to us brohtest in Bethlem

    thou broughtest the boy to us in Bethlehem,

      Exon. 121a; Th. 463, 33; Hö. 79.
  • He seðle gesette in ðære cneohtas and geonge menn lǽrde wǽron

    he set up a school in which boys and young men were taught,

      Bd. 3, 18; S. 545, 45, col. 2.
  • Ðyssum cnyhtum wes líðe

    be gentle to these boys,

      Beo. Th. 2443; B. 1219.
  • Ðæt hie ðæs cnihtes cwealm gesóhton

    that they should seek the young man's death,

      Andr. Kmbl. 2243; An. 1123: 1824; An. 914.
  • Ða cnihtas cræft leornedon

    the youths learned science,

      Cd. 176; Th. 221, 4; Dan. 83: 182; Th. 228, 2; Dan. 196.
  • To cwale cnihta

    for the destruction of the youths,

      Cd. 184; Th. 229, 32; Dan. 226.
  • Cnyhta

    of the youths,

      Exon. 55a; Th. 195, 32; Az. 165.
  • Wundor Godes on ðám cnihtum gecýðed wæs the miracle of God was manifest on the youths, Cd. 197;

    Th.

      245, 32; Dan. 472.
  • Moises sende cnihtas

    Moyses misit juvenes,

      Ex. 24, 5: Cd. 176; Th. 221, 16; Dan. 89: Cd. 195; Th. 243, 5; Dan. 431.
  • Cnihtas wurdon ealde ge giunge ealle forhwerfde to sumum dióre

    the attendants [of Ulysses], old and young, were all transformed to some beast,

      Bt. Met. Fox 26, 170; Met. 26, 85.
  • Agynþ beátan ða cnihtas and ða þínena

    cæperit percutere servos et ancillas,

      Lk. Bos. 12, 45.
  • Ic, Oswold bisceop, landes sumne dǽl sumum cnihte ðæm is Osulf nama, for uncre sybbe, forgeaf

    I, bishop Oswald, have given a portion of land to a knight named Osulf, for our kinship,

      Cod. Dipl. 557; A. D. 969; Kmbl. iii. 49, 32: 612; A. D. 977; Kmbl. iii. 159, 25.
Etymology
[Wyc. kniȝt, knyȝt: R. Brun. knyght: Chauc. knight, knyght: R. Glouc. knygt: Laym. cniht: Orm. cnihtess, pl: Scot. knecht, knycht: Plat. knecht, knekt: Frs. knecht: O. Frs. kniucht, knecht, m: Dut. Kil. Ger. knecht, m: M. H. Ger. knëht, m: O. H. Ger. kneht, m: Dan. knegt, m. f: Swed. knekt, m.]
Derived forms
DER. in-cniht, leorning-.
Linked entries
v.  cneoht cnyht.
Full form

Word-wheel

  • CNIHT, n.