Bosworth Toller's

Anglo-Saxon

Dictionary online

CÓL

  • adjective
Dictionary links
Grammar
CÓL, comp. ra; sup. ost; adj.
Wright's OE grammar
§5; §106; §128; §225; §276; §310; §344; §426;
COOL, cold; frigidus
Show examples
  • Oft ǽspringe útawealleþ of clife hárum cól and hlutor

    a fountain often springs out of a hoar rock cool and clear,

      Bt. Met. Fox 5, 26; Met. 5, 13.
  • Hrér mid sticcan óþ-ðæt hit cól síe

    stir it about with a spoon till it be cool,

      L. M. 3, 26; Lchdm. ii. 324, 1: 2, 51; Lchdm. ii. 270, 2: 3, 30; Lchdm. ii. 326, 6: 3, 31; Lchdm. ii. 326, 15.
  • Wyrc him leage of ellenahsan, þweah his heáfod mid cólre

    make him a ley of elder ashes, wash his head with this cold,

      3, 47; Lchdm. ii. 338, 26.
  • Ða cearwylmas cólran wurþaþ.

    the anxious emotions become cooler,

      Beo. Th. 570; B. 282: 4139; B. 2066.
Etymology
[Prompt. cole algidus: R. Glouc. cole: Plat. kölig, köl: Dut. koel; Kil. koel: Ger. kühl, kühle: M. H. Ger. küele: O. H. Ger. kuol: Dan. kölig, köl: Swed. kylig.]
Full form

Word-wheel

  • CÓL, adj.